Skip to main content

Electronic Resources for Black Studies

The purpose of this research guide is to focus on key Electronic Resources for Black Studies, with an emphasis on African American experience in the United States.

Researching Black Studies & Related Topics

The purpose of this research guide is to focus on key resources for Black Studies, Africana, and world histories, including the United States, Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, with an emphasis on African American experience in the United States. Black Studies overlaps with many other disciplines, we have access to a few focused resource related to this but there is no single database or resource that covers all areas of Black Studies.  This guide should provide a starting point for your research in this area by spotlighting articles, media, primary sources, and data related to topics in the discipline. Keep in mind that some world regions will be included in resources labeled "African Diaspora." 

A Note on Terminology

The Library of Congress uses the formal subject heading African Americans to describe Americans of sub-Saharan African ancestry, but other terms have been more common at different times in American history. Depending on your research topic, you might find it useful to search with other words. 

Afro-American is a variant of African American. Other terms include blacksblack people, and variants like black womenblack men, etc.

In historical research, it helps to know the terms used commonly during the time period you are researching. In early American history and into the early 20th century, many Americans used the term coloreds or colored people, which was gradually replaced by NegroNegroes, and variants, used through the late 1960. 

(Please note that many of the resources in this guide will contain content that can be triggering, upsetting or offensive for some individuals. These resources may possibly use offensive terms, descriptions and images of but not limited to: violence, murder, abuse, sexual assault, torture and colonialism)